Recently WebMD had a great piece about decluttering, http://www.webmd.com/balance/ss/slideshow-bust-your-clutter-hotspots

For example, they suggest putting up hooks and shelves to clear the clutter that accumulates so easily at the entryway to the home.  For an overstuffed pantry, they agree with me--purge through and discard items that are expired.  I like to add that donating NON-expired items to a food drive which you find and know you and your family won't use will also provide extra space as you reload the pantry in categories to make finding what you need easily.

With the mail flowing in each day,WebMD says to change to get as much possible online.  I pay all our bills online and love it.  I think there is more you can do in addition, as mail that keeps coming can easily create a huge pile even after only a week.  Be sure to sort and process it each day.  Open it over your trashcan and pitch anything you know you don't want/need.  The rest needs to get properly filed, whether it goes into bills to be paid or file for taxes.  Get it put into the home it needs and avoid a growing pile!  To get on the Do Not Mail list through the Direct Marketing Association, go to 
https://dmachoice.thedma.org/register.php

See the WebMD piece online to discover other ideas.  You will find renewed calm as the clutter moves out from your surroundings.  It is a great feeling!
 
 
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I love what author Heidi Raschke learns from the book by Joshua Becker "The More of Less"

  • Live with the least amount of stuff that works for you
  • Minimizing looks different for everyone
  • Minimalism doesn’t have to be extreme
  • Owning less stuff is freeing
  • There is no right amount of stuff; “unneeded” is in the eye of the beholder
  • Organizing things is about hanging on to them; minimizing is the opposite of that
  • Focus on quality, not quantity
  • There’s joy in making giving a priority

 
 
 
 
In Heidi Raschke's article"The Great Decluttering Experiment" on nextavenue.org, she talks about her 30 days spent organizing her home using various books throughout as guidelines.  Naturally I found it very interesting.  

Almost all of us in the business of being Professional Organizers will tell you it is highly likely that in the process you will discover "found money" right in your home.  Ms Raschke was exceptionally surprised at what she found:

  • A $25 nail salon gift card in a stack of mail
  • Six one-dollar bills tucked into a children’s book
  • Punch cards worth a free pound of coffee beans at my neighborhood coffee shop
  • Punch cards worth a free latte
  • Punch cards worth a free lunch at that soup and sandwich place by my office
  • Punch cards worth a free loaf at Breadsmith
  • A $5 Target gift card
  • Several dollars’ worth of coins
  • And now a thousand dollars [in cash in the back of her lingerie drawer!]

Now, how is that for motivation to get started on YOUR decluttering!  And even better, calm enters your life as you are no longer feeling overwhelmed by STUFF!  Get going--no better time than the present!